Well, most importantly, to be seen all around us is content. Since the induction of digital and technological mediums, everything is being communicated and transferred to people through content. From ideas to messages, nothing in the world today is transferred through content. The type of content might be different, but it could be said that nothing would be possible in today’s times without content. This is the reason that we regard Content as the King in the world contemporarily.
Just as the YouTube Creator Academy preaches getting to the point quickly in channel trailers, Brian Dean of Backlinko asserts the first 15 seconds of your video is the ideal portion to optimize. Why? Because viewers will decide within that first 15 seconds whether your video is the real deal. Once you’ve got their buy-in, your video will naturally accrue greater watch time, improving your ranking signals.

Include a full transcript of your video in the blog post. If you’re a words guy like yours truly, you’ll want to read along and reference the material after you watch the video. It’s a nice way to flesh out your blog post while using the content you’ve already created. Provide a link to your video to a service like Rev and get your full transcript without typing a thing.
3. Upload your channel art — Channel art is the banner/header that appears towards the top of your channel when viewed on a desktop. Upload a large image (2560×1440) with the most important visual elements located in the inner 1546×423 area (so they’ll still appear when the image is scaled for mobile and tablet). See the image below for various display dimensions.
Like anything else, it’s hard to know what success looks like if you don’t have goals to meet. Your goals will help dictate which platform to begin your video marketing efforts. Facebook, for example, is built for engagement and conversions and Twitter is best used to start a conversation and drive traffic to external sites. When creating your video marketing strategy, consider both the goal of the campaign and the best uses of the platform you’re distributing on.
Support videos help answer common questions about your product or service; explain how to use certain functions, or address common customer issues. Not only are these videos helpful, but they also convey that you’re a business which supports its products and is transparent is helping users. A great example of the reach of support videos is IKEA, which has benefited hugely by sharing videos demonstrating how to put together a range of its furniture line.
YouTube provides you with a way to feature some of your other videos on every video being watched. It’s a bit like free advertising for all your other content. The best part is, you can decided which video(s) to highlight—whether it’s a specific video, playlist or your latest video. YouTube also allows you to decide at which point the featured content should appear. 
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